Posts Tagged ‘Elite Athletes’

Nipaipo Kata Course

Written by bryan. Posted in Coaching, Events

NipaipoSaturday 8th February saw our Karate club run a Kata Masterclass in Basingstoke. 4th Dan Lindsey Andrews and current World Veterans Kata Champion taught the Shito Ryu Kata Nipaipo.

Lindsey began with a brief history of Nipaipo and throughout the Masterclass gave technical tips on how to perform the Kata.

  • There is some disagreement of the Meaning of it’s name with some people saying 28 steps and others saying two eight steps. The original meaning has been lost
  • It’s also known as Nepai in some styles of Karate.
  • Taken originally by Kenwa Mabuni from White Crane style Kung Fu (one of the names it was known as was Er Shi Ba) and adapted to Shito Ryu style of karate. Further adaptations were made by Teruo Hayashi, another exponent of Shito Ryu in the 1980’s.
  • It can also be seen in some Kung Fu styles as Quick Fist form (Sangfeng Quaichuan). The Kung Fu version is much softer and more flowing but similarities are still apparent.
  • Typically considered as 2nd dan and above level kata, in some groups it’s a 6th Dan level Karate kata.
  • Has been taken from Shito Ryu and adapted to suit other styles of karate (e.g. Shorin Ryu).
  • Approx 47 moves incorporating punches, kicks, blocks, locks and throws.

Learning and studying Kata is an important part of karate training. As a form of training it teaches us co-ordination, concentration, develops physical strength, speed, focus, power, breath control and martial skill.

Peeling the Onion.IMG_4542

The process of learning kata involves many layers of development. Typically we start by looking at the moves and their basic elements such as the placement of the feet and hands and slowly piece together the sequence until we have learnt the whole kata.

We also look at the bunkai or meaning and application of the moves, it’s important to understand the applications which you are practising – if not, then ultimately you are merely performing movements with your hands and feet, like a dance,  but you have lost the essence of the martial art which you are trying to learn.

As we become more confident in the sequence we can start to layer in the correct speed, timing, focus and breathing. It is an ongoing learning process and no matter how long you’ve been studying there are always things which can be improved and new and varied applications to be uncovered.

Performing kata in competition adds a new dimension to the challenge. It takes confidence and self-control to perform before judges, spectators and against the abilities of others. It’s amazing how a kata can be performed 100 times in the dojo correctly but when the additional stresses of competition are added the mind goes blank and competitors forget moves or let the nerves take over and lose their strength and spirit. There are some stringent rules applied to competitors which are used to judge a winning performance. There are typically 3 – 5 judges who observe the competitor from different angles and award points based on the following;

 

In a Kata Match, each performance will not be deemed simply good or bad, but will be judged according to the essential elements in two different criteria:

BASIC PERFORMANCE

The following basic points must appear in each performance of a Kata:

  1. Kata sequence.
  2. Control of power.
  3. Control of tension and contraction.
  4. Control of speed and rhythm.
  5. Direction of movements.
  6. Understanding Kata technique.
  7. Show proper understanding of the Kata Bunkai.
  8. Coordination.
  9. Stability and balance.
  10. Pauses.
  11. Kiai.
  12. Breathing.
  13. Concentration.
  14. Spirit.

 

IMG_4555ADVANCED PERFORMANCE

Judges will note the specific important points and the degree of difficulty of the performed Kata. Judgment will be based on:7

a) The mastery of techniques by the contestant.

b) The degree of difficulty and risk in the performance of the Kata.

c) The Budo attitude of the contestant.

 

 

The following youtube clips worth having a look at if you wish to look further into this kata:

http://youtu.be/Bt-jtJOqthw               Quickfist form

http://youtu.be/FXzmbgMs-08           Nepai kata

http://youtu.be/5lsb-Rn2pCM            Nipaipo kata

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I’m losing! What do I do?

Written by Zane. Posted in Black Belt Research Project 2013

Question C:

The question is:

When someone is in the middle of a match and they are losing, what do they think and do to encourage themselves to win?

What this question tells me:

I believe that the question tells me to fight, be outstanding to impress other clubs. It tells me to trust others and not to stop. I am going to write how I feel when I am losing, the answers and ask for people’s opinions outside of karate and then link it to karate.

How I feel when I’m losing:

When I’m losing a match I feel gutted and ashamed of myself. I want to run away and give up. Then I ask myself why did I want to do this in the first place? Then I remind myself that I’m representing the club with true power and pride. Now I’ve got to this level there is no turning back. So all I can do is think positive and try my best.

My answers:

If I was in the middle of a match and I was losing I would see what techniques my opponent is using and see if I have a possibility of stopping it and hopefully add in a counter attack to gain points and maybe retrieve a comeback.

I would never think negative but have a PMA (positive mental attitude). I would be angry and imagine that they insulted me or broke my most treasured possession and I want to fight back because I should.

I also listen to what my coach is trying to tell me because I know he is the one who I could put all my trust into. They are the ones who I should listen to the most because they got me to this level and have as much faith in me as I have faith in them.

If I am being beaten I would just give it my all and just confidently and happily carry on and represent our club and show how we are dedicated to perfection by being brave and fight.

This is what I know I must be doing but in reality it is sometimes different.  In previous competitions I have found that I get angry at myself and get upset because I lost. I get upset because it makes me feel embarrassed and want to run away but there has to be one winner and one loser. Considering that the opponent was good I would learn from the way they successfully won and use the techniques that they used so I could add them in my next match or in the future. I will remind myself this in my next competition and I will remember not to get upset!

Other people’s opinion on the question:

My mum (on running):

When I start thinking of quitting early, I try my best to start thinking positive. I do not want to have the feeling of failure at the end because of stupid excuses like my legs are hurting or I’m too tired and that I can’t complete it, so I block the negatives outside of my brain.  I don’t want to let myself down, or then have to explain to my running friend why I didn’t finish! I remind myself about the good feeling of achievement at the end when I am given my time.  I know I can do it so I put in all effort to get to the end.

Michelle Maddocks (being team captain in netball):

Well as a captain I would look at where the team are weaker. First analysis would be on the opportunities at goal, are we getting plenty of opportunities, but have we weak shooters or is the ball never reaching our shooting circle. From this I would rearrange players accordingly. Then I would look at tactics, so what the opposition are doing and think of ways to interpret their play. Also look at the oppositions weak points and use them to our advantage, for example if the opposition has one shooter better than the other, then we would aim to deliberately block the stronger shooter. The team will discuss this at quarter breaks. On the field I would give more vocal direction and words to keep morale up. If we were losing by a fair amount, I would then set a new aim of getting at least half the number of goals of the opposition has got, which would mean we could gain a higher goal difference in our league. I would also say to the team, losing a game is good practise for future fixtures.

 

Thomas Maddocks (based around football):

Never give up and always encourage others right to the end. It is very difficult for a team or an individual to stay on top for the full duration of the game; you will get a chance. Knowing this fact not panicking and staying positive and determined is really important. You must however take advantage of your opportunities when they arise keep working hard and keep encouraging when you sense the opponent’s heads going down. I personally hate losing and that is all the encouragement I need.

 

The thing all these things have in common is the encouragement you must give to yourself and to give to others; either if they are winning or losing. You have to sense the smell of victory. This links to karate by supporting others and yourself. This mainly relates to the corner chair person who will give you feedback for example: hands up!!! Quick! In out really fast!! Although it is hard to listen when you are thinking about beating your opponent. So you need to keep an ear out.

 

Finally, to answer the question in a simple sentence:

You should encourage others and yourself to win by thinking positively, having the confidence that you can achieve it and focusing on the end result.

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Competition update – Italy Day 3

Written by bryan. Posted in Competition

Day 3 – Italy Competition

 

Another long day, we all made it for breakfast at 7:00 and I’ve just back to my room at 22:26. But must say it’s been a great day for all of the squad.

 

Another good day of high standard competition and of competent refereeing. In many competitions, one sees referees being intimidated by the competitors and coaches and doing a poor job. The last couple of days has shown the referees here to be pretty good and they took no crap from competitors nor coaches. Discipline was firm but fair, with several disqualification for poor control. In one case both competitors got disqualified for getting somewhat fractious with one another, A harsh but necessary object lesson. One of the best things I had to comment on, was that one of the teams seems to contain a lot of ‘divers.’ That is, if they are getting bested in a match, they start to fall down at the slightest hint of a technique. One of them got disqualified for doing exactly this today. In my view good riddance, we are practising Martial Artists and should behave as such.

Magnanimous in victory and gracious in defeat.

 

Today was the day for all of the individual events starting off with the various ladies Kata events before moving onto the Mens Kata events. Then at lunchtime moving onto the Kumite events.

 

We had a few nail biting moments with Jess before it was confirmed that she had reached the finals of the Cadet B (16-17 yrs) Shotokan Karate with a good performance after some heavy competition against some top Italian and Serbian competitors. Holly and Mitchell Roberts from Bicester both pulled in a strong performance to reach the finals of the Shito Ryu events as did Kai Collins. Next up was Edward who was in the Cadet A (14-15 yrs) Males Shotokan category and did a great Bassai Dai in the quarter finals to reach the semi finals, although he produced a strong Enpi in the semi final, it wasn’t quite enough to secure a place in the final.

 

A brief stop for lunch and we moved onto the Kumite with the females leading the way again. The squad had a number of top notch competitors from the Cadets through to the Juniors across all of the weight categories, so an afternoon of excitement was seen. If today was anything to go by, the finals will be great.

 

Jess was up fairly soon and was in great form , convincingly beating her Bosnian competitor with a 6-0 win in the semi final to ensure a place in the final against an Italian opponent. Ed went up against a tough Russian competitor and beat him to face a Ukrainian in the semi final. The semi lasted some while and it was a tough bout, Edward lost the match but picked up some valuable lessons and a Bronze Medal, the first from Basingstoke.

There were many highlights today for example Joby Wilson fought some good matches to take himself through to the final. The best technique I saw from him was a score with a reverse roundkick. Good clean and definitive techniques, all made the Refs jobs easier and hard for his opponents to block. I didn’t get to see everyone’s fight, but the strength in depth of our team is self evident.

 

Total medal haul up to the end of today and before going into the individual and team finals tomorrow.

 

The England squad currently has:-

Gold Medals – 4

Silver  Medals – 5

Bronze Medals – 18 (might be a few light here)

 

Plus

 

There are four competitors in with a medal chance for the kata tomorrow 

Plus guaranteed Gold or silver for the eight teams into the team Kumite finals tomorrow and the 19 people fighting in the individuals Kumite events.

 

Roll on Day 4.

 

 

Joby in action

 

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