Posts Tagged ‘Ladies fitness classes in Basingstoke’

Women can’t learn a Martial Art! Can they?

Written by bryan. Posted in Martial Arts skills

Woman, self defence, lady, Karate, Kickboxing, Taekwondo, Basingstoke, Judo


The Martial Arts are primarily feminine.

Many would think this a strange statement until they start to look a bit deeper.

By nature men are linked to the sun (yang) and women to the moon (yin). Women have a 28 day biorhythmic cycle and their emotions change to reflect where they are on it, their range of emotions tends to be on a far wider spectrum than men. Some say that this would make them unsuitable for martial arts, but if they can use this range of emotions in a positive way they have the ability to become better martial artists than men.

Men are on a 24hour biorhythmic cycle. It’s often said that men are like dogs and women like cats. Dogs are generally the same each day, as long as their basic needs are looked after on a daily basis, they are usually happy. Cats can be moody, one day they respond to you with love and affection, others they are aloof and on some days will hiss at you and are liable to scratch you.

Working or training with a group of men is much the same on a day to day basis the usual banter, jokes and conversation doesn’t change much, working or training with a group of women is not, the moods and conversation can be very diverse depending on the emotional level, it’s also said that when women are together on a day to day basis their ‘moon cycles’ will gradually harmonise. So women are capable of greater emotional depth and if that can be tapped in to and controlled, it will increase martial ability.

The Martial Arts require empathy, they also require the ability to yield, blend, stick, follow and subtly redirect the opponent, these are all feminine qualities. They call for a low centre of balance, which is more common in women, they require grace, fluidity and a natural ‘ease’ of movement and as women tend not rely on strength, technique comes more easily to them

Men enjoy martial arts ‘sparring’ it’s much like the sexual preening that goes on throughout the animal kingdom, where the males of the species lock horns to show females that they are the ones that they should mate with, these shows rarely result in death or permanent damage and the human male enjoys flamboyant shows and techniques that go with Dojo sparring and competition.

The female of most species is deadly. Their role is to protect the family and the young. Threaten any woman’s’ child and watch them turn into a venomous avenger! There is no time to ‘play’ – the female job is to kill and do it fast. Women are also great strategists with the ability to use guile, the weapon of choice is more likely to be poison or a pair of scissors in the back whilst you were asleep or have your back turned than it is to have a toe to toe stand up fight. Traditional martial arts techniques are more designed to suit the female purpose than the male, it’s only as the sporting aspect has come to the fore that the male way of ‘sparring’ has become more popular.

Women are also more intuitive. This comes from the 28 day cycle and their wider emotional range, it makes women function more heavily from the right brain than the left. The ability to read the subliminal body language of a prospective opponent and to read a situation more spatially is a feminine skill.

Women have a greater capacity to accept and deal with pain using emotional strategies than men and once committed, are more likely to maintain their training schedule.

There are many records of female warriors throughout history, the Rig-Veda, an ancient sacred poem of India, written between 3500 and 1800 BC recounts the story of a warrior, Queen Vishpla, who lost her leg in battle, was fitted with an iron prosthesis, and returned to battle. On the walls of Hittite fortresses dating to 1300 BC there were paintings of woman warriors carrying axes and swords.

There are also legends of the Greek Amazon women warriors who may have been based on Scythian women of the 4th and 5th Centuries BC in what is now called Iran.

In 39AD two Vietnamese women named Trung Trac and Trung Nhi led a Vietnamese uprising against the Chinese. They gained control of 65 citadels and reigned as queens until 43 AD.

Even Japan was ruled in 200AD, by a warrior priestess queen called Himoko.

One of the most famous British female warriors was Bouddicca, who was the widow of King Prasutagus of the Iceni tribe. She was regent for her two daughters who inherited half of the kingdom, while the other half was given to Rome. The Romans objected to being given only half of the kingdom and provoked a revolt in 61AD. It was said that in the ranks of her soldiers there were more women than men fighting.

Women have always been fighting alongside men at war or keeping the home and economy safe whilst the men were away and often doing it with deadly efficacy.

More and more women are attending martial arts classes nowadays because they want more than just exercise. Health and fitness play a large part of the training, but self-defence, prevention of abuse and the mental and emotional aspects also play a large part.

In my Dojo 50% of both the adult and children participants are female. This is also reflected in the senior grade classes and the females easily show as much determination and resolve as the male participants.

There are still misogynist instructors around, but they are rapidly becoming a feature of the past as women prove themselves in class and become instructors and chief instructors in their own groups.

The way was paved in karate by people like Pauline Bindra, the first karate black belt in England and now 8th Dan and Chief Instructor of her own Shotokan association. Pauline has been followed by hundreds of female karateka rapidly climbing the black belt ladder. England has had many top world class sport karateka like Tricia Duggin who has proved herself on the world scene time and time again to be a very powerful person and able to knock out most of the male karateka around!

Any good technical martial art will suit women, they can still train in those that rely on strength and size, but will have to compete in their own category and the art will not be so suitable for self-defence. Joining an all female club or class defeats the object if you want self defence and mixed classes certainly seem to spur everyone on to train harder.

The standards for men and women should be equal with women making up with skill what they may lack in size or strength.

When looking to join a new club a woman should look for other females in the club, what their grades are, what their standard is and how many are there, as I said earlier it’s not uncommon nowadays for there to be 50% split between male and females in hard working classes and in the higher grades. It’s good to have people of the same gender in the club to aspire to.

She should look to ensure that the coaches are properly qualified and that they have an equal opportunities policy in practice and not just stuck on the wall.

karate, taekwondo, basingstoke, ladies martial arts, womens martial arts, self defence


Joining a good martial arts club gives the opportunity to take advantage of the feminine qualities that a woman has. Most clubs have a good training policy for women and treat them equal to men. The training will hone the mind, emotions and body in a progressive way for the rest of her life, something that most gyms lack with mindless repetitions of whatever the latest exercise fad is.


It’s also a great holistic lifestyle, giving new friends, new opportunities for travel and many related ways of training, exercise and the fun of investigating the orient and related cultures.

We at Shin Gi Tai positively encourage equal opportunities in the Martial Arts, there are many fine examples of women training in the Martial Arts including our own Lindsey Andrews, who is currently ranked by Karate England as the British #1 for Kata. If you are interested in learning something like Karate, Taekwondo or Kickboxing. Come and see what our ladies can teach you.

This article was written be Steve Rowe www.shikon.com

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Unsung heroes – Caroline Halil secures a team of 75 at Race for Life

Written by bryan. Posted in Events, News

Caroline Halil is a great friend, a super mum, a fantastic Bodycombat coach and moreover an inspiration to all of us. Every day you meet her, you can’t help but become affected by her vivaciousness and bubbling personality. In Caroline’s case it really is true that great things come (as she would put) in wee packages.

This is the story of how one woman from Basingstoke can help to make a difference.

Caroline, simply THANK YOU. x 

 

Bodycombat, les mills, bts, race for life basingstoke, fitness classes, cancer researchA Sherborne St John woman, who was told she wouldn’t be able to have children after battling cancer as a child, has amazed doctors by having four.

Now Caroline, who had to fight for life through emergency surgery for a very rare form of cancer, is the proud mother of Rebecca, 12, Lewis, 7, Reiss, 6 and Samuel, 3.

She says: ““I am very lucky to be here and I want to share my story to give others hope”.

Caroline’s inspirational story has already prompted over seventy women and young girls at the Shin Gi Tai Martial Arts Academy at Basingstoke – where she teaches – to get behind her for this year’s Tesco and Cancer Research UK Race for Life.

She is hoping others will join up for the event at Down Grange Sports Complex at 11.00am on Sunday 26th June to raise money for vital research which is helping more people like Caroline to not only survive cancer, but go on to lead normal lives.

Caroline, who is now 38, was diagnosed with cancer in her kidney on her 10th birthday. She was living in Edinburgh at the time and she had been ill for around two years.

She said: “I had been suffering horrific stomach and back ache but nobody knew what was wrong. I had a hugely bloated stomach and I was eventually taken to hospital where I was immediately sent for emergency surgery to remove a tumour and one of my kidneys.  

At one points her parents were told there was only a 50-50 per cent chance of her surviving the nine-hour operation.

 

However, the cancer had spread and Caroline then faced two years of intensive chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She was told having the treatment as she approached puberty would prevent her from having children.

She said: “It took me months to recover and losing all my hair at that age was a horrific experience. I was told exploratory tests had confirmed I would never be able to have children”.

Caroline and her husband, Spencer, 40, accepted they couldn’t have children when they got married and were therefore stunned when her first pregnancy was discovered when she was in hospital being treated for something totally unrelated.

“A check-up found I was three-months pregnant with Rebecca. I was advised for my own health not to continue with the pregnancy, but I decided to take the chance. It was a complicated pregnancy, but we both survived”.

Her fourth pregnancy was also discovered during an unrelated hospital check-up, although the pregnancy itself was relatively straight forward.

“I am currently very well and feel very lucky that we have proved everyone wrong who said I couldn’t have children”.   

Caroline has been an active fundraiser and has raised several thousands of pounds for a variety of charities since she was a child.

“I have taken part in Race for Life with Rebecca for several years but wondered if I could encourage some members of the martial arts club to join us this year”.

Seventy-five women and young girls from the club’s 400 members have joined the team in support of Caroline **.

Lea Blake, the Basingstoke Race for Life organiser, said: “We are very grateful to the ladies from the Shin Gi Tai Martial Arts Academy for making up such an impressive team.

“However, this year recruitment for the Basingstoke event is significantly lower than anticipated. With just 7 weeks to go, over 1500 women have already entered but there are still 2583 places to fill.

“Some women think they won’t be able to complete the course but in face most are able to walk 5k in an hour. In that same amount of time around five people will be diagnosed with cancer in the South.*

“If fewer women take part there will be less money to fund research, which in turn means fewer lives saved in the future”.

Women in the South can enter Tesco and Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life at www.raceforlife.org or by calling 0871 641 1111.

For media enquiries please call Helen Johnstone of Cancer Research on 07768 987 925

Ends

 

* All cancers (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) diagnosed from 2005-2007 in the South East Government Office Region.

 

** To find out more about the Shin Gi Tai martial Arts Academy please go to: www.basingstokekarate.com or telephone 01256 364104

 

About Race for Life

 

  • Tesco and Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life 2011 is the UK’s largest women-only fundraising event series with over 300 events around the UK from May to the end of July.
  • Women of all ages, abilities, shapes and sizes from all over the UK join together to walk, jog or run 5k to raise money to help beat cancer.  
  • 2011 is a very ambitious year for Tesco and Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life.  The goal is to raise £80 million to fund Cancer Research UK’s life-saving research. 
  • In 2011, women will have the opportunity to take part in the traditional 5k or opt for a10k route, without having to pay an additional entry fee, at 42 venues across the UK.
  • Race for Life started as one event in 1994 at Battersea Park with 680 participants.  In 2011 it is celebrating its 17th birthday.
  • Since it started, an incredible 5.4 million participants across the UK have raised over £362 million to fund Cancer Research UK’s vital work.
  • Entry fee is £14.99 to cover the costs of staging the event series.  All money raised in sponsorship will go directly to our work to help beat cancer.

 

About Cancer Research UK

 

  • Cancer Research UK is the world’s leading cancer charity dedicated to saving lives through research
  • The charity’s groundbreaking work into the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer has helped save millions of lives.  This work is funded entirely by the public.
  • Cancer Research UK has been at the heart of the progress that has already seen survival rates double in the last forty years.
  • Cancer Research UK supports research into all aspects of cancer through the work of over 4,000 scientists, doctors and nurses.
  • Together with its partners and supporters, Cancer Research UK’s vision is to beat cancer.

 

For further information about Cancer Research UK’s work or to find out how to support the charity, please call 020 3469 6699 or visit www.cancerresearchuk.org

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Basingstoke Les Mills Body Combat

Written by bryan. Posted in Health and Fitness

Basingstoke Body Combat

Basingstoke Body Combat

We’ve just started a brand new class – Les Mills BodyCombat in Basingstoke. Its a great way of getting fit and staying fit without having to have an expensive membership to a gym. So far we’ve done a couple of taster classes and they’ve been well attended by both men and women with the participants being suitably physically tired by the end, but mentally xenical stimulated. I have to admit that, although I can do the moves, kind of ;-), I can’t keep to a beat to save my life, but still have had fun in the fitness class, come along and try a class and don’t laugh too much at the guy who is out of time to the music, its me.

BodyCombat at our Basingstoke Gym 

 Tuesday morning 10:00 – 11:00 and Thursday evening 7:15 – 8:15

 

 

BODYCOMBAT™ Benefits

  • Improves heart and lung function and reduces the risk of heart disease
  • Tones and shapes key muscle groups
  • Burns calories for a leaner body
  • Improves co-ordination and agility
  • Improves bone density
  • Improves posture and core strength and stability
  • Builds self-confidence

 

 

Print out and bring the VIP pass below to try a free class with our BodyCombat teachers.

 

BodyCombat Pay as you go classes in Basingstoke

BodyCombat Pay as you go classes in Basingstoke

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