Posts Tagged ‘Martial Arts club in Basingstoke’

Competition update – Italy Day 1

Written by bryan. Posted in Competition

End of the first full day in Caorle in Italy for the Cadets and Junior’s World Karate Championships. Fair to say that the five of us are a little tired.

 

As a recap to yesterday, we arrived in the resort at around 12:30, quick lunch and then training at 2:30, all fighting related. Although we did do some individual Kata work after the main squad session had finished. The evening training was cancelled, because all the kids and most of the adults looked too tired to do anything sensible. I did spare a thought for the referees, an all day seminar on the rules. Mark, Geoff and Michael did a good job and are good for us to ask tough questions about the rules to provide some clarification.

 

An early breakfast at 7:30 for some of us, well at least 4 of us. Then meeting at 9:30 for kata practice working on Bassai Dai before the main squad session in the morning. Only a small amount of fine tuning and both were off working hard. We only focussed on this one, as it’s the first one for both of them to perform.

 

In the main squad session Phil Patrick from Oxford led a good warm up and went though some good partnerwork which covered reaction drills and speed drills with the team, both Ed and Jess are looking sharp. Ed was so confident that he decided to invent a new kick ‘the Winky Geri’ suffice to say it worked. Both times against me 8-( I’ve also have picked up some new ideas as well to test out.
Good team spirit with the team and lots of support from all the coaches and the parents present, I haven’t counted up exactly, but I think there’s around 80 of us from England. Nice to see from friends from Wales in the shape of Steve Wellington and Luke Howard and also from Northern Ireland with Dave Brashaw and his team.

 

As a team we then had to go and register , with 800 ish competitors from 21 Countries having to register over , the logistics to get them all weighed and verified as been the person on their passport was exhaustive to say the least. Finally after 2 hours of queuing we made it to the end and it was time for a quick lunch.

 

I attended the coaches session this afternoon and that was useful to attend to find out some of the future plans and also get some last minute reminders about the rules. Ian Cuthbert and Abdu Shaher will be getting the various category lists tomorrow morning, so we’ll find out who the competition is then.

 

Almost the last thing was the opening ceremony, was nice to see so many proud kids walking behind the flags of their respective countries. The acoustics in the hall made hearing the opening speeches difficult though but it was good to see Vic Charles from England being part of this . The opening ceremony rounded off with some demonstrations including one very good ballet performance and another, which although had good dancing, saw most of us surprised at the clothing worn by the youngsters performing.  A short demonstration of Iaido was interesting to watch and what I think was an Italian hypnotist who proceed to ‘hypnotise’ members of the Italian squad.

 

Finally time at 8:40 to start on dinner and then up to bed. Breakfast at 7:30, maybe even I’ll join them this time and then kata work at 9:00.

The World Championships start at 4:00pm tomorrow with the team events, here we go.

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I’m a Black Belt, I don’t need to train because I’m a teacher…

Written by bryan. Posted in Coaching

Karate Brighton Hill, Karate Chalk RidgeI’m a Black Belt, I don’t need to train as much…Often the immortal words said by someone who thinks they’ve made it and stops training because they are now an awesome ‘Teacher.’  

Gichin Funakoshi (Founder of Shotokan Karate) said “Karate is like boiling water, if you do not heat it constantly, it will cool.”

Effectively what he’s saying is that unless one keeps training, then one loses ones skills. You may have become a Black Belt 2, 5, 10, 15 or whatever years ago. But unless you’ve kept up regular practice and training, ideally under a more senior instructor, then sadly your skills atrophy and decline very rapidly.

As a teacher, you have the responsibility to not only keep your skills and knowledge upto date, but to actually improve upon them. If you aren’t then consider what kind of example, as a teacher, you are setting your students.

I’m not going to name them but there are lots of videos on the Internet to serve as evidence, if you can really be bothered to look.  There are many examples of Martial Arts practitioners who were excellent when they trained, but they became teachers and then heads of their own associations and some even became ‘Masters’ (I use that term in a very loose manner) and then became pretty abysmal, due to lack of training

Sure as we get older into our 40s and 50s most of us can’t train in exactly the same way as we used to do when we were in our 20s. The big secret….You don’t have to. You have to train the best that you can right NOW and learn to adapt what you do and how you do it. But you still have to train.

One of my teachers Steve Rowe from Shikon had replacement knees fitted several years ago and there were some very big issues post surgery, which meant he couldn’t walk properly. Three years on and he is finally starting to walk without the aid of a stick. However during that time he has continued to train (and teach) some of the time he’s been seated whilst training and even engaged in pushing hands and other fighting drills this way. Earlier this week when I saw him, he had made a major leap of progress in that he was able to stand on one leg and balance whilst practising a form. It might not sound a lot, but after his surgery that was a fairly big deal and came after six months of hard work to achieve it. The message was clear. Small incremental, intelligent improvement to skills was the way forward.

 

I’ve been training for a ‘few years’ now, I’ve trained under many of the older generation of top international and national Karate teachers. I could sit back on my laurels and take it easy. I don’t. Why? Well simply there’s still too much too learn and improve upon. To sign off on a ‘fun note’ here’s a short video of me practising some Judo (and getting thrown around) with Chris Doherty 6th Dan from the British Judo Association, (who is the Regional Technical Officer for our area.) and learning how to do it, properly.

If you’re a coach, remember that old adage and make sure in your case it isn’t true. “Those that can, do. Those that can’t, coach.”

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Martial Arts, is it just a physical skillset?

Written by Sophie. Posted in Black Belt Research Project 2013

Kids Martial Arts, Kids Karate, Kids Judo, Basingstoke, Kids Kung FuBlack Belt Research Project 2013 Introduction by Sophie Pogmore 

My Research Topic is 

a)      Learning a Martial Art is a physical skillset. What other things do we need to train and learn as a Martial Artist?

b)      What is your biggest fear as a Martial Artist, how are you working to overcome it?

c)      Everyone is different both physically but also emotionally. Some are shy, some are confident, others are passive and some are aggressive. Looking across a range of different types of people how can a study of martial arts bring balance to someone’s life and describe how that study could have both a positive or a negative effect on them.

 

To be able to do my project for my grading I am going to research my facts in books, on Google and I will use my own knowledge. I will also talk to friends and family about their knowledge and about their experiences. My projects are about my greatest fears and how I will over come them, what other things we need to learn as martial artists and how martial arts changes people. I will also present my information and findings by making essays. I might also make a short power point for the viewers to watch. This will explain in detail about one of my project but it will make it more interesting to read.

I personally hope to get more information and facts about karate and about how it can change someone, from doing my project. I want to find out more from other people and what karate means to them. How does it change you emotionally and what benefits can you get out of it? It will hopefully help me with my understanding for it and for others.

I also hope that my work will help other children to carry on doing karate and not give up. It will also help them work on their fears so that they can eventually over come them. They can take away information and facts that can help them in classes and so that they can develop their skills. They will be able to know when to defend themselves. I hope they are able to take on board some of these things to help them in karate.

When I plan my sixty minute talk I will probable make another power point showing different parts to my talk and how I will separate some parts of information to my other facts and knowledge. I also might do a rough plan to show where I want people in the room and how many minutes I will talk about one thing and then move on from it.

To be able to do my 5 minute talk to friends, I will write myself a plan of what I will say and when I will say it. I also might make a booklet or something to show my findings and information. I will also tell them where I got my facts from. I will also prepare to answer any questions people may ask.

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Martial Arts Standards Agency British Judo British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body The World Union of Karate Federations Shi Kon Martial Arts British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body Safeguarding

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Telephone (01256) 364104.

Email: info@basingstokekarate.com.

Shin Gi Tai Martial Arts Academy,
The Annex @ ITT Industries,
Jays Close,
Basingstoke,
RG22 4BA