Posts Tagged ‘self confidence’

Going from Loser to Winner

Written by Zane. Posted in Black Belt Research Project 2013

By Zane Sewell

Question C:

The question is:

When someone is in the middle of a match and they are losing, what do they think and do to encourage themselves to win?

What this question tells me:

I believe that the question tells me to fight, be outstanding to impress other clubs. It tells me to trust others and not to stop. I am going to write how I feel when I am losing, the answers and ask for people’s opinions outside of karate and then link it to karate.

How I feel when I’m losing:

When I’m losing a match I feel gutted and ashamed of myself. I want to run away and give up. Then I ask myself why did I want to do this in the first place? Then I remind myself that I’m representing the club with true power and pride. Now I’ve got to this level there is no turning back. So all I can do is think positive and try my best.

My answers:

If I was in the middle of a match and I was losing I would see what techniques my opponent is using and see if I have a possibility of stopping it and hopefully add in a counter attack to gain points and maybe retrieve a comeback.

I would never think negative but have a PMA (positive mental attitude). I would be angry and imagine that they insulted me or broke my most treasured possession and I want to fight back because I should.

I also listen to what my coach is trying to tell me because I know he is the one who I could put all my trust into. They are the ones who I should listen to the most because they got me to this level and have as much faith in me as I have faith in them.

If I am being beaten I would just give it my all and just confidently and happily carry on and represent our club and show how we are dedicated to perfection by being brave and fight.

This is what I know I must be doing but in reality it is sometimes different.  In previous competitions I have found that I get angry at myself and get upset because I lost. I get upset because it makes me feel embarrassed and want to run away but there has to be one winner and one loser. Considering that the opponent was good I would learn from the way they successfully won and use the techniques that they used so I could add them in my next match or in the future. I will remind myself this in my next competition and I will remember not to get upset!

Other people’s opinion on the question:

My mum (on running):

When I start thinking of quitting early, I try my best to start thinking positive. I do not want to have the feeling of failure at the end because of stupid excuses like my legs are hurting or I’m too tired and that I can’t complete it, so I block the negatives outside of my brain.  I don’t want to let myself down, or then have to explain to my running friend why I didn’t finish! I remind myself about the good feeling of achievement at the end when I am given my time.  I know I can do it so I put in all effort to get to the end.

Michelle Maddocks (being team captain in netball):

Well as a captain I would look at where the team are weaker. First analysis would be on the opportunities at goal, are we getting plenty of opportunities, but have we weak shooters or is the ball never reaching our shooting circle. From this I would rearrange players accordingly. Then I would look at tactics, so what the opposition are doing and think of ways to interpret their play. Also look at the oppositions weak points and use them to our advantage, for example if the opposition has one shooter better than the other, then we would aim to deliberately block the stronger shooter. The team will discuss this at quarter breaks. On the field I would give more vocal direction and words to keep morale up. If we were losing by a fair amount, I would then set a new aim of getting at least half the number of goals of the opposition has got, which would mean we could gain a higher goal difference in our league. I would also say to the team, losing a game is good practise for future fixtures.

 

Thomas Maddocks (based around football):

Never give up and always encourage others right to the end. It is very difficult for a team or an individual to stay on top for the full duration of the game; you will get a chance. Knowing this fact not panicking and staying positive and determined is really important. You must however take advantage of your opportunities when they arise keep working hard and keep encouraging when you sense the opponent’s heads going down. I personally hate losing and that is all the encouragement I need.

 

The thing all these things have in common is the encouragement you must give to yourself and to give to others; either if they are winning or losing. You have to sense the smell of victory. This links to karate by supporting others and yourself. This mainly relates to the corner chair person who will give you feedback for example: hands up!!! Quick! In out really fast!! Although it is hard to listen when you are thinking about beating your opponent. So you need to keep an ear out.

 

Finally, to answer the question in a simple sentence:

You should encourage others and yourself to win by thinking positively, having the confidence that you can achieve it and focusing on the end result.

Facebooktwitter

I’m losing! What do I do?

Written by Zane. Posted in Black Belt Research Project 2013

Question C:

The question is:

When someone is in the middle of a match and they are losing, what do they think and do to encourage themselves to win?

What this question tells me:

I believe that the question tells me to fight, be outstanding to impress other clubs. It tells me to trust others and not to stop. I am going to write how I feel when I am losing, the answers and ask for people’s opinions outside of karate and then link it to karate.

How I feel when I’m losing:

When I’m losing a match I feel gutted and ashamed of myself. I want to run away and give up. Then I ask myself why did I want to do this in the first place? Then I remind myself that I’m representing the club with true power and pride. Now I’ve got to this level there is no turning back. So all I can do is think positive and try my best.

My answers:

If I was in the middle of a match and I was losing I would see what techniques my opponent is using and see if I have a possibility of stopping it and hopefully add in a counter attack to gain points and maybe retrieve a comeback.

I would never think negative but have a PMA (positive mental attitude). I would be angry and imagine that they insulted me or broke my most treasured possession and I want to fight back because I should.

I also listen to what my coach is trying to tell me because I know he is the one who I could put all my trust into. They are the ones who I should listen to the most because they got me to this level and have as much faith in me as I have faith in them.

If I am being beaten I would just give it my all and just confidently and happily carry on and represent our club and show how we are dedicated to perfection by being brave and fight.

This is what I know I must be doing but in reality it is sometimes different.  In previous competitions I have found that I get angry at myself and get upset because I lost. I get upset because it makes me feel embarrassed and want to run away but there has to be one winner and one loser. Considering that the opponent was good I would learn from the way they successfully won and use the techniques that they used so I could add them in my next match or in the future. I will remind myself this in my next competition and I will remember not to get upset!

Other people’s opinion on the question:

My mum (on running):

When I start thinking of quitting early, I try my best to start thinking positive. I do not want to have the feeling of failure at the end because of stupid excuses like my legs are hurting or I’m too tired and that I can’t complete it, so I block the negatives outside of my brain.  I don’t want to let myself down, or then have to explain to my running friend why I didn’t finish! I remind myself about the good feeling of achievement at the end when I am given my time.  I know I can do it so I put in all effort to get to the end.

Michelle Maddocks (being team captain in netball):

Well as a captain I would look at where the team are weaker. First analysis would be on the opportunities at goal, are we getting plenty of opportunities, but have we weak shooters or is the ball never reaching our shooting circle. From this I would rearrange players accordingly. Then I would look at tactics, so what the opposition are doing and think of ways to interpret their play. Also look at the oppositions weak points and use them to our advantage, for example if the opposition has one shooter better than the other, then we would aim to deliberately block the stronger shooter. The team will discuss this at quarter breaks. On the field I would give more vocal direction and words to keep morale up. If we were losing by a fair amount, I would then set a new aim of getting at least half the number of goals of the opposition has got, which would mean we could gain a higher goal difference in our league. I would also say to the team, losing a game is good practise for future fixtures.

 

Thomas Maddocks (based around football):

Never give up and always encourage others right to the end. It is very difficult for a team or an individual to stay on top for the full duration of the game; you will get a chance. Knowing this fact not panicking and staying positive and determined is really important. You must however take advantage of your opportunities when they arise keep working hard and keep encouraging when you sense the opponent’s heads going down. I personally hate losing and that is all the encouragement I need.

 

The thing all these things have in common is the encouragement you must give to yourself and to give to others; either if they are winning or losing. You have to sense the smell of victory. This links to karate by supporting others and yourself. This mainly relates to the corner chair person who will give you feedback for example: hands up!!! Quick! In out really fast!! Although it is hard to listen when you are thinking about beating your opponent. So you need to keep an ear out.

 

Finally, to answer the question in a simple sentence:

You should encourage others and yourself to win by thinking positively, having the confidence that you can achieve it and focusing on the end result.

Facebooktwitter

Learning with Communication

Written by Aaron. Posted in Black Belt Research Project 2013

communication, comms, skills, Learning with Communication by Aaron Potter

Report 1

A)   As a martial artist what methods of communication do we use to learn Martial Arts?

The definition of communication is: the imparting or exchanging of information by speaking, writing, or using some other medium.

As I see it communication can be separated into two different types:  verbal and non-verbal communication. Both are used in different ways for different reasons with different results. Different types of communication, work better than others for different people. For example: Auditory learners like things to be explained to them, Visual learners like watching demonstrations of what’s being explained and Kinaesthetic learners prefer to learn through doing. In order to achieve the best learning experience, professionals say that you require a mixture of all three to truly benefit and remember what we have learnt.

Verbal Communication

Verbal communication is the use of voice including: tone, accent, pronunciation and projection. Our verbal communication, when teaching, is used to explain the moves needed and why we are doing these moves. This is in order for us to understand how we can perform and apply the moves.

I feel that feedback is probably the most useful and helpful method of communication for learning as it allows us to identify ours and others errors and mistakes. This gives us the ability to work on certain areas that require improvement. With this feedback, comes repetition and working with others and ourselves until we can achieve the desired action we need.

Also we need to use communication when sparring with partners so they know if they are going to hard and fast. This would allow us to gain the best training/learning from our partner. Communication is also used in the theory of Karate as well as we learn off instructors how we should pronounce the certain moves and names of Katas in Japanese.

After watching a few videos on YouTube and reading various blogs, on people performing certain moves (e.g. a roundhouse kick) and opinions on communication when learning ‘The Arts’, they explain the move broken down into its different techniques. Personally I feel explaining in this way if effective to learning, as it would enable the person learning to develop and practice the different areas and techniques needed to perform the movement. One person on YouTube looked at the way of what ‘martial arts’ means. He saw the word ‘arts’ as a way of expressing one’s self, which is a way of using a medium to communicate with an audience. The audience is someone who you are working with or is teaching you martial arts and so good communication would mean you are talking on topic about how and why you are learning this and how you can use it. As well as this we have to be able to adapt our own communication and learning methods to suit others who’s may be completely different.

Non-verbal Communication

Non-verbal communication uses body language and facial expressions to communicate with other people. Personally I feel that we learn most of the times by watching people do actions and then us copying them. This is also how we learn different fighting techniques by watching what other people do and trying it out for ourselves.

Communication is as much listening as it is speaking. In Martial Arts, we must listen in order to learn (so this is a key point) as it enables us hear what we must do. Without this we would be doing the wrong thing or unable to understand and therefore unable to progress to the next level.

We also have to put in some communication to learn. I strongly believe that we have to be in the right frame of mind to give off a good body language. Without a good positive mental state we would give off the wrong sense to people that we were unable to learn or not receiving what they are trying to impart on us. So in short terms we must be completely focused on what we are being taught.

To Summarise…

  • Communication is imparting and receiving knowledge though a medium.
  • Communication can be broken down into two types: Verbal and Non-verbal.
  • There are different types of learners: Auditory, Visual, and Kinaesthetic.
  •  Moves and techniques are mainly explained and demonstrated as or to a group of people.
  • We learn from this why we are doing this move.
  • A useful method of communication is through partner work and identifying each other’s mistakes and correcting them.
  • Communication is used when we learn to apply techniques to sparring, we can ask out opponent to slow down if they are going to hard and fast.
  • Different people we work with have different communication methods.
  • We need to have good basic communication skills to work with others.
  • Learning different fighting techniques are often through non-verbally watching others.
  • Communication is as much listening as it is speaking.
  • We have to show good non-verbal communication to others to learn from them and we must be focused.
Facebooktwitter