Posts Tagged ‘self defence in Basingstoke’

Fear, Stress, Nerves, Anxiety, Adrenalin, Self-Consciousness and Choking are all part of Martial Arts training

Written by Bob. Posted in Black Belt Research Project 2013, Self Defence


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Black Belt Grading Project 2013

Bob Wilson

My grading project comprises the challenging issues of Fear, Anxiety, Adrenalin, Self Consciousness and Choking which are all part of Martial Arts training. In order to bring the topic to life and to ensure that what I write is entertaining I will base my topic around two characters who find themselves in a scenario anyone could be subject to and we’ll look at what is going on both physically, mentally and how one of the characters’ Martial Arts training helps them both in the situation.

I intend to look in depth at how the body naturally reacts to Fear, Stress and Anxiety and valium also what Adrenaline would do in a self defence scenario. I’m going to try and present full facts and not dress up the reality – for this I make no apology. As we go through the reports more information will come to light that will hopefully change views on how this initial scenario is seen.

 

To set the scene I thought I would look at a scenario and then later on we can break down certain parts further. 

Tony and Rachel are a couple in their late 20’s/early 30’s who have known each other for many years but recent started seeing each other. Tony is a Fudge Packer in a local Confectionary Warehouse and Rachel works in the Leisure and Tourism industry. Over text messages they decide that on Saturday night they will hop on a train and go to a nearby town. Whilst there they go for a few drinks and around 1 am decide to catch the last train home. On walking to the train station they encounter 3 men who stop Tony and ask if he has any spare change, he politely declines at which point the lead youth says ‘I’ll take your phones then…’.

 

So Let’s pause the scenario there and see what’s happened so far. Tony’s been studying Karate for almost 4 years and knows that self-protection begins when you leave the house not when you encounter a potential problem, his martial arts training has also opened his eyes to the possibility of dangers so as he is out of his own area and taking a lady out he is aware this type of situation was possible and to give himself the best chance he deliberately hasn’t had a lot to drink. He is also acutely aware that the last comment, ‘I’ll take your phone then…’ has changed the situation from one of three lads simply asking for some change etc to one of a potential street robbery where both he and Rachel are now potentially in danger. He has no idea if anyone is carrying a weapon.

Back to the scenario and Tony replies ‘No, mate – You’re not having our phones, we’ve had a good night and I need to get onto the platform, excuse me’. As he goes to walk past, the 1st male starts to become agitated and aggressive. He pushes Tony back shouts at him ‘Give me your phone!!’ all whilst still flanked by two other males.

So again lets look at what’s going on. Tony’s body now enters a state of emergency (also known as the ‘Fight or Flight response’). The stress of the situation has now caused Tony’s heart rate to increase from around 40/50 beats per minute to nearly 100 (bpm). Adrenaline is rapidly being released by his body which also stimulates Dopamine (a natural pain killer). His breathing becomes shallower and more rapid to keep up with the body’s increased demand to provide blood and oxygen to the major organs.

In this situation people respond differently depending on their psychological state, their confidence, whether they are prepared to engage an assailant etc etc. It’s easy for a person to go into a state of panic and fall to pieces. This often happens to people who are simply not prepared.

At this point it is very much up to the individual as to how they deal with the situation. Tim Larkin a US Martial Arts expert (a hand to hand combat trainer for the US Navy Seals) who hold’s extremely violent and controversial views on self protection (so much so that he was banned from the United Kingdom by the Home Secretary Theresa May in August 2012 because “his presence here was not conducive to the public good”) believes that in this sort of situation you should allow the adrenalin to empower you in order to maim, severely injure or even kill the individual concerned. We’ll look at these views later in the project.

So Tony, still being confronted by the attacker now allows his martial arts training to take over. He knows he has to relax and regain control of his emotions. He looks for an avenue out of the situation without resorting to violence. Unfortunately there’s nobody around at that time that could help, and the distance to the platform is around 25 meters of polished floor with around 20 stairs at the end and Rachel, helpfully, has worn high heels. Again Tony communicates with his attacker but there is no option and things quickly escalate.

 

In this case study I’ve outlined most areas in my project and to move this on I will be looking at the following in more depth…

 

* What specifically causes these stimuli are there other areas that I haven’t yet looked at?

We’ll look more at the physical, psychological and emotional areas of these stimuli. The lasting impact of being a victim and the benefits of having the right training. We’ll also look at high profile victims of crime and try to gain an understanding of how their

 

* How do these emotions manifest themselves in others?

In this section I’m going to look at the Attacker as well as the ‘Victim’. What is their mindset and how do they deal with it and are there other tactics to deal with an aggressor that don’t involve fighting. Also in this section I want to look at the emotions behind whether the attacker being armed changes their state of mind and the state of mind of the defender.

 

* How can Martial Arts training help with controlling these points?

Here I’ll look at how Martial Arts turns potential Victims into prepared defenders. Also the ability no not ‘look like a victim’ and  I’ll look more in depth at how Martial Arts begins when you leave the house (not when you’re confronted with a problem). We’ll also touch on whether there’s a danger with over confidence and finish with looking at the ‘Fight or Flight response’.

 

* The merits or not of Sports Psychology dealing with the emotions.

Does the murky world of Sports Psychology help with these emotions or is it all an expensive placebo? Also we’ll look at not only the ‘Sports Psychology’ but also the psychology of high profile teachers around the World and ask, how extreme is ‘extreme’?

 

* Finally, I’ll be looking at are there parallels between working life and Martial Arts in this context?

Can Martial Arts training spill over into an everyday working life with positive benefits? Working in a high pressure job myself I’ll base this on my day to day life as well as other high profile people I am able to research.

 

That’s a rough outline, I’m sure my research will take me off on different tangents but that’s all part of learning.  All that matters is that at the end of this I/we are able to better understand the FEAR concept. Finally in November I will end with a coaching a session on this topic where I will be inviting others to contribute their thoughts, feelings and possible previous experiences.

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The Internet Bully! (Self Defence 101)

Written by bryan. Posted in Self Defence

Cyber Bullying, Self Defence Basingstoke, Hampshire Self Protection, Hampshire Self Defence, Law, Internet Crime, Harassment, In  today’s society most of us have a real reliance on the Internet in it’s various guises. Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Linkedin, MySpace et al are here to stay, maybe not in their current forms because they’ll morph and merge over time. With the explosion in good quality internet connection from our Mobile phones, more and more of us are online.

I know they’ve got a vested interest, but Google’s Senior Vice President recently predicted that 50% of all adverts will be online in five years time, guess where their R&D investment will be going. Big players like Google, Facebook and our own mobile phone providers will continue to drive both traffic and our habits.

In most cases people use the internet appropriately to swap gossip, make plans for the weekend, discuss outfits or talk about their favourite sports teams. However there is a dark side, when the technology is abused, or used to harass or threaten others, there can be consequences legally that the perpetrator can face.

In late December 2012 both The Times and The Daily Mail carried stories talking about the massive increase in Internet crime.

  • 5,000 reported cases to 29 Police forces on Facebook or Twitter (556 in 2008, 4909 in 2011)
  • 650 people charged with offences
  • High profile crimes raised awareness in the media, included claims made about Tom Daley’s (the Diver) dead Father and comments about missing children such as Madeleine McCann, which resulted in a 12 week jail sentence.

There are four UK statute laws that are relevant to the use of IT in relation to bullying.  These are:

How these Acts can be related to bullying, and specifically to cyberbullying, is outlined below. If the bullying is based on sexual, racial or religious grounds, prosecution could be sought through anti-discriminatory laws. See the case of footballer Stan Collymore, who was racially abused on Twitter and the instigator was arrested by the Police

 

Protection from Harassment Act 1997

This Act was passed following concerns that stalking was not dealt with effectively under the existing legislation.  The Act does not refer solely to stalking but also covers harassment in a wider sense.  The Act states that it is unlawful to cause harassment, alarm or distress by a course of conduct and states that:-

A person must not pursue a course of conduct, which:

    • Equates to harassment of another person
    • They know or should to know, amounts to harassment of another person.

There is some anecdotal evidence that the police are more comfortable in bringing forward this law when dealing with issues of Cyberbullying. The police have successfully used the Protection from Harassment Act to prosecute for the sending of offensive e-mails through the internet.  Such messages (as well as Text messages) will also constitute an offence under the Malicious Communications Act. Facebook was in 2012 forced by the courts to reveal personal details of people who had harassed a woman.

 

Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994

This Act defines a criminal offence of intentional harassment, which covers all forms, including sexual harassment.  A person is guilty of an offence if, with intent to cause a person harassment, alarm or distress, he/she

  • uses threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour or disorderly behaviour; or
  • displays any writing, sign or other visible representation which is threatening, abusive or insulting, thereby causing that or another person harassment, alarm or distress.

 

Malicious Communications Act 1998/Telecommunications Act 1984

Under this Act it is an offence to send an indecent, offensive or threatening letter, electronic communication or other article to another person.  Under section 43 of the Telecommunications Act 1984 it is a similar offence to send a telephone message which is indecent, offensive or threatening.

Both these offences are punishable with up to six months imprisonment and/or a fine.
The Malicious Communications offences are wider ranging, but under the Telecommunications offences, it is likely that the Police will use the former Act to bring a charge.

 

The Communications Act 2003

The Communications Act 2003 is by far the most recent Act to be passed.  Section 127 states that a person is guilty of an offence if he/she

text bullying, sms bullying, internet bullying, self defence in Basingstoke. self protection in basingstoke, the law and self defence

  • (1) A person is guilty of an offence if he—

(a) sends by means of a public electronic communications network a message or other matter that is grossly offensive or of an indecent, obscene or menacing character; or

(b) causes any such message or matter to be so sent.

  • (2) A person is guilty of an offence if, for the purpose of causing annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety to another, he—

(a) sends by means of a public electronic communications network, a message that he knows to be false,

(b) causes such a message to be sent; or

(c) persistently makes use of a public electronic communications network.

  • (3) A person guilty of an offence under this section shall be liable, on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale, or to both

People                                                                                                          

 4,500 young people talked to ChildLine about online bullying last year.

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Do you make excuses? (Self Defence 101)

Written by bryan. Posted in Self Defence

Martial Arts isn’t all about fighting, far from it.

Martial Arts is all about setting yourself up for challenges, meeting them and overcoming them. Physically and Emotionally this is the case whether it’s just turning up for your first class, being examined for your first belt, sparring for the first time, entering a competition etc.

Many people makes excuses for not doing things. They predetermine that whatever activity they are about to undertake is too difficult for them or that they are too old, too tall, too small, too soon, too late or more often, just too lazy with a penchant for excuses.

Watch this video and then try to find an excuse.

 

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