Posts Tagged ‘Black belt’

Black Belt Grading – Congratulations

Written by bryan. Posted in Grading

Basingstoke Black Belts, Judo, Karate, Kung Fu, Ju Jitsu

On the weekend of 2nd December we held our biggest grading of the year in Basingstoke. We had students from Karate, Ju Jitsu and Judo all grading. Of which Seven of them were being examined for their Black Belt.

The weekend started with the younger children from the Young Legends, aged between 6- 9 going for their first belt. Their grading consisted of a 60 minute class to give a brief reminder of the things they had to demonstrate. They progressed onto the formal grading itself which consisted demonstrating blocks, kicks, strikes, throws and groundwork along with their forms and partnerwork.

We progressed onto those pupils from Young Legends trying for their Orange to Yellow belts. The format was similar albeit with additional techniques required because of their greater experience.

Saturday finished off with a group of Urban Warriors, which our Martial Arts classes for children between 10 – 14 years old.  Members were testing from belts between Orange and  Green and given that they are more mature and physically developed, greater expectations were on their shoulders. In this case the examination itself lasted a full two hours with four examiners assessing the progress and capability of each person attempting their next belt. In this group there were some very polished performances, particularly from Ava and Mia who double graded.

Kickboxing, Karate, Taekwondo classes in Basingstoke

It was a bright and breezy start on Sunday morning for our Judo-ka. Judo for children is divided into Belts called Mons and there are 18 to pass before Black Belt and for the adults, six Kyu grades to pass. There was a wide spectrum of grade being attempted from 1st Mon Red belt all the way through to 1st Kyu Brown belt. We covered a wide of fundamental techniques for the first two coloured belts that everyone practiced and then individual’s grade requirements were practiced and demonstrated to the examiners. The grading finished off this time with Randori for all the participants, congratulations to Ross who passed his 1st Kyu, next step Black Belt.

Next up on the Sunday were the intermediate grades for our Urban Warriors and Adults classes ranging from Red belt to Purple and White. Given the age group of this group, the intensity and expectations were set high from the start. We never give belts away, they are always hard earnt and something to be proud of. This grading was no exception with some incredible focus and determination shown. At this level gradings are a real test of one’s skill and determination with fundamentals across a wide range of punches, kicks, strikes, throws, locks and groundwork all having to be demonstrated to a high level followed by Forms and Kata with Sparring to finish.

Girl kicks high

The final session of the weekend was the most eagerly and nervously awaited, our annual Black Belt grading. Black Belt candidates have the year prior to the grading to prepare for their grading with a ‘little project’ to help them focus and achieve. They study and reflect upon their goals for the year, their strengths and weaknesses, their physical activity, their diet, a personal assignment to research and discuss with peers, a lesson to plan and then deliver to prove their knowledge and ability to pass on their skills and knowledge and finally a review of their progress during the year. The theory side of the grading has to be passed before the candidate is invited to take part in the physical examination. The physical grading itself is 3 hours long and is designed to stretch all the participants. Everyone grading was reminded that at this level they had to pass each section of the grading or they would be asked to leave the mats at the end of that section.

In the grading this year we had members ranging from Brown Belt through to 2nd Dan Black Belt grading. We started with ‘volunteers’ leading us through the Forms syllabus from White Belt forms all the way through to Black Belt. With six examiners marking the grading, everyone had to remain focussed and delivering skilful techniques. They proceeded from there onto demonstrating single fundamental techniques performed which then lead into increasing complicated combinations of techniques. They then demonstrated throws and hold downs, before moving onto Padwork to test the speed and power of their techniques and also their reaction times. Individuals were then called up to demonstrate individual Forms and Kata, with a range wide performed including 16 Gates, Circles, Tai Ki, Enpi, Jion, Seienchin, Bassai Dai, Kosukan Dai, Kanku Sho, Nipaipo, Suparempei, Chatan Yara No Kushanku, Yang Chen Fu and The Dao Form.

The grading concluded with the sparring section which included multiple fights with dojo fighting rules, which included fighting at all ranges including on the ground. Black Belt candidates also had to fight against multiple opponents to test their resolve, courage and ability to fight under significant pressure. Immediately on finishing this, the Black Belt candidates carried on by performing more Kata or Forms and finally finished with Pushing Hands skills at a little over the 3 hours 15 minutes mark. It’s fair to say that everyone was physically and emotionally tired but had a sense of satisfaction for completing the grading.

On the Monday evening our Combat Ju Jitsu group were graded and again their syllabus gets harder as they progress with a requirement to be able to show many different ways of performing a technique against different people to pressure test it.

It was a rare grading weekend that everyone passed their grading and received new belts. We only ever invite people to attempt their next belt if we believe that they are ready to pass, however it is up to them on the day to perform to the best of their ability and to prove that they are ready for their new belt.

Congratulations to everyone who passed their grading over the weekend, especially our newest Black Belts, who can wear their new belts with pride.

 

 

 

 

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What, if any, is the relationship between philosophy and Martial Arts in today’s society?

Written by Sue. Posted in Black Belt Research Project 2013

Philosophy & Martial Arts

Susan Pogmore

SIXTH REPORT – OCTOBER 2013

 

What, if any, is the relationship between philosophy and Martial Arts in today’s society?

 

Sophie and I recently attended an England Squad training session in Loughborough with Bryan and Lindsey and several other members from Shin Gi Tai. We were both incredibly nervous, not knowing what to expect. It certainly was hard work and an incredibly opportunity to watch and learn from other members of the England squad. I was fortunate to work for a short while with a lovely girl, called Maddie Moore. She was lightening fast and very good, she was also very humble and gracious.

Turned out that this young woman is something of a superstar – she won the Junior European Championships in the Female Cadet Team rotation category and the bronze medal for Female Cadet Kumite team Sanbon in 2011. In 2013 she is ranked 1st in Senior Kumite, open weight; 2nd in Senior Female Kumite U60K and 7th in Senior Female Ippon Kumite, open weight. She is seriously impressive and yet there was no hint of an ego, no arrogance about her at all. She was kind, friendly and encouraging.

 

An Excerpt from Modern Bushido: Living a life of excellence

By Bohdi Sanders

 

It’s not about getting a black belt; it’s about being one.

To so many people, getting their black belt is their ultimate goal, and once they accomplish that goal, they are done with the martial arts. Their black belt is basically no more than a trophy or a certificate of participation for them. They worked hard to get their black belt and now they are happy.

This is wrong thinking. For the martial arts to really be what they are meant to be, they have to become a part of who you are. Martial arts are not really about winning trophies and getting belts. True martial arts are a way of life. In the same way, your goal should not be to GET a black belt, but to BE a black belt.

 

Any fool can go online and buy a black belt for very little money. I understand, people who just want a black, don’t want to buy it, they want to earn it and that is admirable. But hopefully, their instructor will instil the love of the warrior lifestyle into them during their quest, and it will become more of a quest to BE a black belt, than to get a black belt and put it in their trophy case.

So what does it mean to be a black belt? It means different things to different people, but to me it means you have shown perseverance and dedication to the martial arts and are ready to continue your learning, along with helping others who are just starting their journey. It means greater responsibility to both your dojo and the lower belts who train at your dojo.

New students in the martial arts look up to the black belts. As a black belt you have a duty to set a good example for the novice martial artist. You are a mentor to these students and should show the honour and character that once were considered a part of being a black belt. You represent your martial art, your instructor, and you organisation. And you represent yourself. Do so with honour, character and integrity.

Once you are a black belt, people have greater expectations of you. These traits and expectations should have been taught to you during your training to become a black belt. Character training is a vital part of martial arts training, but has fallen to the wayside over the past years. Maybe it is time to bring back honour, character, and integrity back to the dojo and produce real black belts instead of just presenting trophy belts.

 

The relationship between philosophy and martial arts in today’s society is as varied as it has ever been. When Karate was in its infancy there was a very strong moral code of conduct. The Japanese culture, especially at that time, was full of tradition. Times have changed and even in Japan, standards have lowered. Honour and chivalry are not valued as they once were.

Once karate made the international journey, it travelled away from these traditions and was in some ways corrupted by other cultures. Karate then made the transition into a competitive sport, where for some the acquisition of trophies is the primary focus.

There are clubs all around the world that operate on a franchise basis and there is no quality or experience within the dojo, just the desire to make money.

Then there are clubs like Shin Gi Tai, where the quality and experience of the coaches is WORLD CLASS. The dedication from the coaches is second to none. The students, both young and old, learn the values of the ancient warriors. There is a strong feeling of comradery, friendship and loyalty.

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Martial Arts, is it just a physical skillset?

Written by Sophie. Posted in Black Belt Research Project 2013

Kids Martial Arts, Kids Karate, Kids Judo, Basingstoke, Kids Kung FuBlack Belt Research Project 2013 Introduction by Sophie Pogmore 

My Research Topic is 

a)      Learning a Martial Art is a physical skillset. What other things do we need to train and learn as a Martial Artist?

b)      What is your biggest fear as a Martial Artist, how are you working to overcome it?

c)      Everyone is different both physically but also emotionally. Some are shy, some are confident, others are passive and some are aggressive. Looking across a range of different types of people how can a study of martial arts bring balance to someone’s life and describe how that study could have both a positive or a negative effect on them.

 

To be able to do my project for my grading I am going to research my facts in books, on Google and I will use my own knowledge. I will also talk to friends and family about their knowledge and about their experiences. My projects are about my greatest fears and how I will over come them, what other things we need to learn as martial artists and how martial arts changes people. I will also present my information and findings by making essays. I might also make a short power point for the viewers to watch. This will explain in detail about one of my project but it will make it more interesting to read.

I personally hope to get more information and facts about karate and about how it can change someone, from doing my project. I want to find out more from other people and what karate means to them. How does it change you emotionally and what benefits can you get out of it? It will hopefully help me with my understanding for it and for others.

I also hope that my work will help other children to carry on doing karate and not give up. It will also help them work on their fears so that they can eventually over come them. They can take away information and facts that can help them in classes and so that they can develop their skills. They will be able to know when to defend themselves. I hope they are able to take on board some of these things to help them in karate.

When I plan my sixty minute talk I will probable make another power point showing different parts to my talk and how I will separate some parts of information to my other facts and knowledge. I also might do a rough plan to show where I want people in the room and how many minutes I will talk about one thing and then move on from it.

To be able to do my 5 minute talk to friends, I will write myself a plan of what I will say and when I will say it. I also might make a booklet or something to show my findings and information. I will also tell them where I got my facts from. I will also prepare to answer any questions people may ask.

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Martial Arts Standards Agency British Judo British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body The World Union of Karate Federations Shi Kon Martial Arts British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body

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Telephone (01256) 364104.

Email: info@basingstokekarate.com.

Shin Gi Tai Martial Arts Academy,
The Annex @ ITT Industries,
Jays Close,
Basingstoke,
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