Posts Tagged ‘kickboxing in Basingstoke’

New Classes starting from September

Written by bryan. Posted in Coaching

Starting in September we have a range of new classes starting at our Basingstoke based Martial Arts Club.

Self Protection Basingstoke, Ladies only Kickboxing in Basingstoke. Karate for Ladies in Basingstoke. Ladies only, Women Only, Gym, Basingstoke, Self Defence, Self ProtectionLadies Kickboxing Class

From Tuesday 9th September at 7:30pm we are running a Ladies Only Kickboxing class. Focussing on Fitness and Self Defence, this class is suitable for beginners. If you’re looking to get fit and tone up, this is going to be a great class for you.

You’ll be burning lots of calories, hitting our range of bags and pads, having  a good time with friends. No men allowed, they wouldn’t be able to stand the pace.

 

 

 

 

 

Karate Kata ClassKata Class

Multiple World Karate Kata Champion, Lindsey Andrews is coaching a Karate Kata only class every Tuesday evening from 6:30, this is a pay as you go viagra class for existing members and will cover a range of Kata from different Karate styles. This Karate class in Basingstoke starts on Tuesday 2nd September.

 

 

 

 

Children’s Martial Arts Classes

Children's Martial Arts in Basingstoke

Every Wednesday afternoon from 4:00pm, we will be holding a new class dedicated to those children aged between the ages of 6 – 9 years old. This class covers a wide range of techniques from our Karate syllabus.

 

Every Thursday afternoon from 5:30, we will be running a new class for our older children between 10 – 14 years old. This class introduces them to our Kung Fu syllabus and included standing work, grappling and throws along with groundwork.

 

 

 

 

 

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What’s in a name?

Written by bryan. Posted in Martial Arts

I’ve been asked many times over the years, what style of Karate do you do? Too many people get too hung up on styles, particularly those that have done some prior training.

Black Judo, Black Belt Karate in Basingstoke

Black Judo, Black Belt Karate in Basingstoke

To a great extent Karate is Karate whether its Goju, Shito-Ryu, Wado, Shotokan, Uechi Ryu, Kyokushinkai or whatever (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karate for more information on styles). Each style has something to offer, but at the end of the day, there are only so many ways to kick, strike, block, throw and punch. Of course an individual practitioner might tell you…….. that their style is better than style x because ……well generally there are lots of different reasons and most of the reasons given aren’t usually genuine in the sense of being correct.

All the styles that I’ve ever seen or trained in work at long (kicking) range, medium (punching) range and close (elbows/knees) range. They all teach front punch, reverse punch, upper block, round kick etc etc. Okay there may be some stylistic difference between them. For example how they generate power in performing a reverse punch you can use your hips (amongst other parts of the body) to generate power, but double hip, single hip or no hips? Consider a Roundhouse kick, do you impact with the ball of the foot, instep, shin or even big toe? Linear or circular, hard or soft, Kime or no Kime…….I could go on, but you probably get the idea, that’s are some differences between styles, but what’s necessary to keep in mind is that If you watch two exponents from different styles fighting, there is very little to choose between them in terms of repertoire of techniques, nor in terms of which style wins most enough at an international competitive level.

What is more important is the individual teacher and their ability to impart knowledge with some substance behind it. If we take one style or lets narrow it down to an association within that style and then further to a single club within that association, there are and should be differences down to the dojo level, let alone as you investigate across a cross section of different clubs in an association. Its not rocket science really to figure out why. As individuals we are all different; – weight, flexibility, strength, co-ordination, age, body type, fitness levels etc. Given this fact, why do some instructors insist that we have a vanilla flavoured Karate style.

I remember Kanazawa Sensei http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hirokazu_Kanazawa at a grading saying to someone grading for Sandan (3rd Dan,)  okay your way is different to mine, but at your level you must change your Karate to suit you. Karate should be different its not meant to be a one size fits all Martial Art, its meant to be personalised by the practitioner, rather than developing clones of a particular instructor. Heaven forbid that people look different when training in class, it makes the dojo look so untidy. I found myself out of favour at a course once, when the instructor moved my punching a fraction. I asked him during a break and with no-one else present, why? His answer was because it looked better, not that it was more practical or more effective, but because of aesthetics, so that I’d look the same as the rest of his students. It’s sometimes confuses visiting students when they train with us to see a Kata being performed in different ways by different students. For example is a particular leg movement a crescent kick, knee stomp, knee block or step? Does it really matter which of these moves is used as long as the practitioner understands why they do the application? I don’t believe that it does, of course I’m open to being persuaded, but as far as I’ve seen so far the study of Karate and in fact Martial Arts is a personal thing. I’ve trained with many of the most respected instructors both from within the UK and also from overseas and the quality that they share is their individuality, regardless of which style they are meant to be practicing.

Don’t worry about the name of a style, the approach of the instructor is the most important thing.

As the pop group Bananarama and Fun Boy Three sang many years ago “It’s not what you do, but the way that you do it.”

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You’ve got real potential!

Written by bryan. Posted in Coaching

Karate, Kung Fu, Basingstoke, Martial ArtsYou’ve got real potential!

How many time do we hear this said of ourselves and then then start to feel really proud of our accomplishments because someone has said this to us. For most of us this would be the norm. Why? Because it makes us feel good about ourselves, doesn’t it. Be truthful, we all like to have nice things said about us.

Not many of us have thought what may be implied with the comment “You’ve got real potential.” What do I mean, well for example, someone saying this could also mean:-

1 – “You’ve got real potential” – Why don’t you start working hard and get good.

2 – “You’ve got real potential” – You’re not very good because you don’t have the discipline.

3 – “You’ve got real potential” – If only you’d bother to try and achieve your potential

4 – “You’ve got real potential” – You’ve got real potential, sadly you are never going to reach it.

5 – “You’ve got real potential” – Umm, I can’t think of anything nicer to say

6 – “You’ve got real potential” – Keep practicing hard and correctly and you’ll stay on the path to achieving that potential.

So the next time you get told “You’ve got real potential”  be honest with yourself and ask yourself what it really means for you. We all hope it’s number 6, but it’s up to you, to make sure it is #6 rather than one of the others.

Look at some of the sports stars, who had potential, Paul Gascoigne from Football, you could even argue Johnny Wilkinson from Rugby, although a superb Rugby player never reached his full potential due to injuries, Tim Henman, great for British Morale and bringing the country together at Wimbledon’s Tennis week but again never achieved his full potential and lets not forget about Iron Mike Tyson, one of the best boxers ever and he threw it all away whilst still in his prime. All of these stars were in their own right very talented (much better at something than most of us can hope to achieve) and very good, having had some great successes, but they never really nailed it, so they are unlikely to be remembered in the same way as Bobby Charlton, Gareth Edwards, Roger Federer or Muhammed Ali, who all ‘made it’ and are remembered, revered and respected because of it.

What was the difference? Maybe a little luck and certainly a lot of skill, but not to forget the words of Gary Player when asked about his ‘lucky streak.’ “It’s funny, the harder I practice, the luckier I seem to get.”

If you want something badly enough, then work hard enough to achieve it and depending upon how important it is to you, decide what you are prepared to sacrifice to get it. Be prepared for setbacks and knock-backs along the way. Sometimes your short term plan won’t work out, don’t get despondent, keep working on the plan, make corrections, make improvements. Analyse what you do and why and how it’s working for you. That is of course if you want any chance of reaching your full potential.

 

Remember the only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

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Martial Arts Standards Agency British Judo British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body The World Union of Karate Federations Shi Kon Martial Arts British Council for Chinese Martial Arts – National Governing Body

Contact Us

Telephone (01256) 364104.

Email: info@basingstokekarate.com.

Shin Gi Tai Martial Arts Academy,
The Annex @ ITT Industries,
Jays Close,
Basingstoke,
RG22 4BA